Thursday, January 28, 2010

Film Holder to Photo Frame

Have some old large format film holders sitting around? Use them as picture frames!
Hang them on a wall or put them in a stand.

Don't have any but like this idea?  Click HERE to shop KEH Camera's selection of film holders.

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

Camera Killers: Dust and Fungus

There are a few things that can "kill" your camera equipment, both in function and value...

The first "killer" is DUST. While keeping your camera & lenses away from dirt & grime sounds like common sense, it's not always the case. Even if you avoid specifically dusty areas, it is inevitable that dust will still creep in to every crevasse it can. The most important part to keep dust out of is your digital cameras sensor. Some ways to prevent this (as much as possible) are: If there's no lens on your D-SLR, it better have a body cap on it! Always keep the internal parts of your camera protected. It's best when changing lenses to do it when the camera is off, and to hold the mount slightly downward as you're changing. Also, if your other pieces of equipment are dusty (like your lens) it can easily transfer to your image sensor. So, also keep everything as dirt & dust free as possible.

You can purchase compressed air cans which give a nice swift blow of air onto whatever you're pointing it at. There are also bulb blowers which are easier to transport in a camera bag, are inexpensive, and are an easy way to keep those nasty little particles away.


Another "killer" is FUNGUS. Fungus likes to creep into lenses when you least expect it. On normal fungus levels, it is very hard to spot unless you know exactly what you're looking for. But the thing about fungus is, it doesn't stop growing. Over time it will etch the glass in a lens to the point of no return. Fungus is especially a problem in humid climates... and I don't just mean the rainforest... If you live near a body of water, or a place where it rains on a fairly regular basis, your equipment is susceptible.

In addition to keeping your equipment properly stored, I suggest silica packs. These can be purchased in large sizes that can be re-activated by cooking it in the oven (best for larger spaces or multiple pieces of equipment), or for a temporary (& smaller space), the little packs that come in shoe boxes can be thrown into your camera bag as well. I also use these in my print boxes for preserving old photographs.

What will a lens full of fungus actually do, you ask? Well, aside from being icky and causing possible health problems, get too much in there and your images will no longer be sharp, but soft in focus.

Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Digital Media Card Tips

No matter which type of card (CF I&II, SD, XD, SM, MS, etc.) your camera takes, it's a good idea to format it on a regular basis. While it may not happen often, these little cards of information can fail & reach the end of their life if used a lot. To keep your card in good health, format it in the camera from time to time.  This clears up the card and erases all of the data. Of course make sure that you have downloaded and saved onto a computer all of the files on the card before formatting. Some older cards & cameras may also show error messages if the card is not properly formatted to that camera.


Each camera menu is different, but you can typically find the formatting function in one of the last sections in your menu (usually marked with a wrench symbol & yellow in color), and also in the menu when you're in "playback" mode. If you can't find it, refer to your user manual. All you have to do is select "format" and hit your enter or set key and confirm.

A few other things to remember about cards is to keep them in their little plastic cases when not in the camera body. This protects the small connection holes/contacts that transfers your data from camera to card, card to computer, and protects the shell of the card itself.


Also, when putting in and taking the memory cards out of the card slot, both in a camera & in a card reader, be gentle! There are little pins on the other end that can be easily bent. If the pins get bent too many times the pins can also break off. If either of these things happen, you won't be able to use the camera or card reader until you get it repaired.

The most efficient & reliable way to download your digital information. Why use a card reader instead of just plugging your camera into the computer to download? It's a safer transfer, downloads faster, takes up less space on your desktop, doesn't need batteries, does not use the cameras battery power and you don't have to dig for the correct connection cord. They are inexpensive and plug directly into your computer via USB or FireWire. 

Saturday, January 16, 2010

Welcome

Welcome to the KEH Camera Blog!

You can expect to find posts on camera equipment, photography related information, new and collectible items, tips and tricks, fun and useful accessories, troubleshooting hints, gift guides, events, interviews, useful links, industry news and much more!

It is our goal to post information for all levels of photographers, from beginner to professional, and everything in between.

Be sure to stop by often to stay up-to-date with KEH Camera!